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Archive for the ‘Stanegate Second Thoughts’ Category

We got Tooey some snow boots. When we go running around in the snow, the poor girl quickly gets these huge snow balls between her pads and between her toes, and she feels she must get the snow out right now. That means she’ll run 20 yards, stop and lie down to chew out the snow balls, run 20 more yards, stop again, etc., etc. No fun at all, especially since Mr. Carlin Hotfoot just runs and runs and runs in zigs and zags all around her.

So, boots. The ones we got fit her feet, but the front ones kept slipping down. We determined that the front boots needed to be taller and have another strap that would tie around above the carpal pad. So, Russ bought some matching ripstop, and I did some sewing.

Not quite as professional looking as the original boots, but they seem to work okay.

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Now she’s comfortable enough to zig in the show to Carlin’s zag.

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I think in the last several years, all the sewing I’ve done has been for the dogs. Dog rugs, holding blinds, snow boots. What’s next? Hmmm…. maybe some camo waterproof crate pads, like fellow IWS person, Ruth, makes.

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Love,

Russ, Tooey, Patrice, and Carlin

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Since about noon yesterday, Boise got about 8 inches of light fluffy snow.

So this morning, up and down our street, neighbors were shoveling driveways and brushing snow off their cars. Wanting to fit in (and also wanting to be able to drive), Russ did the driveway, and I did the car and truck.

As per usual, the dogs helped.

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“You are so lucky,” the woman said. I had just confirmed that yes, I do work at Healthwise. “You get to bring your dog to work, and then you get to walk these trails at lunch.”

She smiled, and I smiled back as we each went on our own way. She was headed out into the Boise foothills with her dog, and Tooey and I were headed back in to work.

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At the time of this photo, we were about 20 minutes away from the building, which is nestled right into the base of the Boise foothills. The building is so close that its parking lot is often used by folks who bring their dogs to walk or run the trails. But from where we were, you could look out south, toward the building, but not see it. Just snow, juniper and other desert plants, and the cloudy skies that will bring more snow tomorrow.

And she’s right. I am lucky. Not just for the reasons she stated, but also to have this winter landscape so close, and a companion handy to explore it with.

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161111_0013blogRather than wind chill factors and deep snow, today’s November weather threatened us with sunburn and overheating. But before it got too warm today, Carlin and Tooey flushed up this nice rooster pheasant from a field not too far from Horseshoe Bend, Idaho. I was also fortunate to bring it down with a quick shot from my 20 gauge for an easy retrieve for Carlin.

This makes it Carlin’s official first bird of Idaho, which he can now add to his list of successful bird states that includes Oregon, Washington, Montana, California, and Colorado. Tooey already has some Idaho birds on her resume, but is willing to keep adding to her tally. Carlin will have to hustle to keep up with her bird numbers. And he still needs to add a few states to his list in order to match Tooey who has the same list as Carlin plus Kansas and Utah, and the province of British Columbia.

Life is good, especially with good dogs . . .

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I love my new job. And one of the many reasons I love my new job is that we can bring dogs to work.

Of course, there are rules. The dogs must be well-behaved. They must be up to date on their vaccinations. They must not chew, scratch, pee on, or otherwise destroy the furniture. All completely reasonable requirements.

So, having signed a piece of paper that says that Tooey will follow all the rules, I got to start bringing Tooey to work.

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I have an office with a glass-paned door. (Amazing, in this day and age, that a non-management person can have an office with a door. Mostly, I’ve worked in cubes.) So when I’m in my office, Tooey can be out of her crate, hanging out, chewing on her bone, watching the people go by in the hallway. When I’m not in my office, say for meetings or trips to the copier or coffee machine, she’s sleeping in her crate.

And at lunch, we go for walks in the surrounding hills. Lately, it’s been lovely — warm but not too hot, sunny, and not overly crowded. The hills surrounding Healthwise, my employer, have popular trails where dogs can be off leash. But in the middle of the work day, we share the trail with only a few people walking their dogs, a couple of bicyclists, and several joggers. And up at the top of the hill, there are moments when we have it all to ourselves.

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Carlin and Tooey ton their Idaho pheasant hunt

Carlin and Tooey taking a break during their first team pheasant hunt

I had hoped to make the move to Idaho by the opening of pheasant season, but I missed it by a couple of weeks. So here we are at the beginning of November. We headed 30 miles north of Boise to an area along the Payette River. Both dogs totally knew what was up — having left home with blaze orange and a shotgun means only one thing.

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Normally when hunting solo, my preferred method is to take one dog out at a time. But this time, that method precipitated a severe temper tantrum with the remaining pup. Nothing like working a field while listening to your other dog barking non-stop in the car, a half mile away.

Today’s goal was not to come home with a lot of birds, but it was to reward the pups for their patience over the last month while we disrupted their routine with our move to Idaho. So I succumbed to the whining, and took both dogs out together to work as a brace covering the fields. It actually worked out quite well. They stuck together, both keeping inside gunning range, and when one became focused on a specific piece of heavy cover, the other stepped in to help scour out any potential birds.

After a few hours of this, we didn’t flush any birds, but we did come across a nice rooster pheasant. It was a simple retrieve as it was found lying dead at our feet. Some other hunter must have shot this one, but was not able to locate it. Based on the body temperature, it appeared to have been downed only a couple of hours earlier. And so with that bird in the hand, we continued to look for our own and enjoy the cool Idaho November day.

Final score: no shots fired, the one retrieved rooster, a few miles of hiking, and two very happy dogs.

Life is good . . . .

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