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Archive for May, 2015

Western Oregon doesn’t have many bogs. There are some cranberry bogs on the Pacific coast, and there are (or at least, were) bogs near the great Klamath Marsh in Central Oregon, from which a mummified body, named Peat Man, was unearthed during the winter of 1999.

But there aren’t the vast swaths of bog in Oregon as there are in Ireland, bogs where Irish Water Spaniels were used to hunt gamebirds and waterfowl, giving them the nickname “Bog Dogs”.

Then again, there are usually lots of small lakes and ponds in Oregon. But this spring, there just aren’t. They’re all dried or drying up.

Here’s one example: The Oregon bog you see my three IWS cavorting in (after a couple hours of field training) in the photo below is usually a shallow lake this time of year, not drying up until July.

Suavie Bog Dogs

Cooper, Tooey, and Carlin sittin’ in the bog

This year, it’s just three inches of undried up water filling the spaces between aquatic plants, creating a not-very muddy, but very squishy bog.

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Russ and the three curly brown bog dogs

Even though there wasn’t any water to practice water retrieves with, there was plenty of firm cover alongside the bog to work on land retrieves.

Carlin started us out with three retrieves, all in a line with one another, one at 125 yards, another at 100 yards, and a third at about 50 yards. The hope is that he would start to learn to judge distances.

He found and delivered the first mark just fine. Unsurprisingly, for the second mark, he lasered out to where the first mark had fallen, and was a bit puzzled not to find his bumper in the same spot. He widened his search, and found the second mark. Then for the third mark, he went out to where the first mark had landed, then to where the second mark had landed, and wow! — no bumper in either place. So he widened his search again, and found the third bumper.

Cooper went next, with exactly the same drill. For him, who know distances pretty well, the challenge was staying steady at the line. Russ had to persuade him to come back into place and sit before releasing him to the retrieve. By now, though, this is a familiar ritual in itself. Both Russ and Cooper know how that dance goes.

Tooey went last. Instead of retrieves, for her we planted a frozen chukar in deep cover, and sent her from about 60 yards away to go find it. After repeating that several times in different locations, we repeated the same exercise with the two boys (with Carlin’s distance shortened up to about 25 yards). All three did a very nice job, finding and delivering the rapidly defrosting bird.

So, work done, it was time to play, to go get wet and cool, dogs a’bogging.

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Yes, I know one of you flushed and retrieved the pheasant in the pot.
You’re still not getting any.

Last night was Carlin’s first night back at home for a while. He joined Cooper and Tooey in the kitchen to watch Russ cook — always a fascinating assignment. Russ started the process of cooking IWS-flushed pheasant tonight, and we’ll eat it tomorrow. Yum!

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Well, the Gun Bitch trophy going on to the next person — to recognize the #1 Gun Bitch at this year’s IWSCA National Specialty.

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Tooey won it last year for being the most beautiful bitch with a hunt test title, but now it was time to send the trophy on. Before we shipped the it to the awards committee, though, we put Tooey’s plaque on the back. As long as someone has this trophy, Tooey’s name will live on.

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Tooey has been a wonderful dog, a beautiful girl and a great hunter. Russ and I have been so pleased that she lives and works with us.

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Well, I can’t have a Mini-Cooper (unfortunately, you can’t fit three Irish Water Spaniels into a Mini-Cooper). And I don’t need Cooper tires or Cooper surgical instruments. But, I can have Cooper’s Hall Applegate Red wine from a local winery.

It was delicious. Especially with Russ’s mushroom, squash, and cheese ravioli.

Yum!

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Cooper always tried to protect us from the big scary things. In some cases, this is a very good thing. In some others, not so much.

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